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Full text of "North Carolina tobacco report [serial]"

TOBACCO REPORT 

f962-f963 



IGHT 




^(oiC)> b THE BULLETIN 



a— 



of i-he 
Norfh Carolina Deparfment of Agriculture 

L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner 
Number 171 April, 1963 



FOREWORD 

This fourteenth annual issue of the Tobacco Report 
has been compiled and prepared by W. P. Hedrick and 
J. H. Cyrus, tobacco specialists with the Division of 
Markets of the North Carolina Department of Agri- 
culture, in cooperation with the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture under the Research and Marketing Act. 

Credit is due the Cooperative Crop Reporting Serv- 
ice of the North Carolina and United States Depart- 
ments of Agriculture, and the Tobacco Branch of 
the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service for much 
of the statistical data contained herein. 

This issue of the Tobacco Report is dedicated to 
the tobacco seed breeders of the flue-cured area who 
have developed quality seed that have enabled tobacco 
growers in North Carolina to continue to produce the 
World's finest quality tobacco. 




Commissioner of Agriculture 



For free distribution by the Tobacco Section, 
Markets Division, North Carolina Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. Raleigh, N. C. 



4/63— 6M 

2 



Tobacco Seed Producers recorded with the Commissioner of 
Agriculture under North Carolina Seed Law, 1963. 

F. B. Allen, Kembridge, Va. 

Bell's Seed Farm, Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Z. R. Bissette, Route 1, Wilson, N. C. 

Coker Pedigreed Seed Company, Hartsville, S. C. 

C. M. Dean, Route 3, Oxford, N. C. 

W. M. Gill, Route 3, Roxboro, N. C. 

F. W. Muggins & Son, Route 5, Fayetteville, N. C. 

T. Frank Jones Seed, Inc., Goldsboro, N. C. 

M. L. Mangum, Route 2, Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

McNair Seed Company, Laurinburg, N. C. 

Matthews Brothers, Route 1, Broadnax, Va. 

Reams Seed Company, Apex, N. C. 

Smith Seed Farms, Route 2, Wilson, N. C. 

Speight Seed Farms, Winterville, N. C. 

R. H. Terrell, Route 2, Reidsville, N. C. 

Wagwood Farms, Inc., Gibsonville, N. C. 

Woodrow Wallers, Route 2, Whiteville, N. C. 

Watson Seed Farms, Inc., Rocky Mount, N. C. 

R. J. Works & Sons, Rocky Mount, N. C. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 
3 
. 5 



Tobacco Seed Producers, 1963 - - - 

The Outlook, 1963 i -- 

Summary of Standard Grades for 1963 - - — 12 

State Summary, 1962-63..- - '^* 

Noorth Carolina Tobacco Warehouse Salels Report, 1962-63 16 

Summary of Dealer and Warehouse Resales, 1962-63 - 1^ 

Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured Tobacco By States, 1962 IS 

Stabilization Receipts by Beltls— 1962 - ^^ 

Flue-Cured Movement In and Out of North Carolina. -- 1^ 

Hurley Movement In and Out of North Carolina... 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops, 1919-1962 -— 

North Carolina Hurley Crops, 1928-1962 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments, 1963 

North Carolina Hurley Tobacco Alloltments, 1963 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and Operators 
By Belts and Markets 

Domestic Cigarette Consumption By Kinds, 1961 Back Cover 



Outlook 1963 

The tobacco outlook for 1963 and the next few years will be 
closely related to the 1962 marketing season and prior years. The 
past year was a crisis year which flue-cured growers are begin- 
ning to expect periodically. 

The tobacco allotment and price support program has worked 
well for the past 23 years, with few exceptions. These exceptions 
have occurred in areas and in events over which tobacco growers 
have had little or no control. The real beginning of the present 
"tobacco crisis" occurred in 1952, at which time a national maga- 
zine published several articles attempting to show a possible con- 
nection between health and cigarette smoking. Cigarettes, which 
use about 95 per cent of the flue cured crop, took a rather drastic 
drop in sales. 

It took about Ave years for this situation to reach a climax. 
During this period many consumers switched from the use of reg- 
ular cigarettes to filter tip cigarettes, that use less tobacco. The 
domestic disappearance of flue cured dropped from 828 million 
pounds in 1952 to 705 million pounds in 1956. The stocks held 
by the Flue-Cured Tobacco Stabilization Cooperative had reached 
a figure of 680 million pounds during this period. In 1957 grow- 
ers took a 20 per cent acreage reduction, which added up to a 45 
per cent reduction in a five year period. 

Between 1957 and 1961 the program again adjusted itself to a 
fair balance between production and disappearance, even though 
the yields per acre had increased from 1,471 pounds per acre to 
1,792 pounds in 1961. Growers were taking advantage of im- 
proved technology that enabled them to overcome acreage re- 
ductions, reduce ever mounting production cost and maintain a 
steady income. 

Many new methods and practices which contribute to more ef- 
ficient production have met resistance. For example, buying 
companies objected to oil curers when they first came into use. 
Development of more efficient manufacturing processes are wel- 
comed as technological advances, while new practices used by 
farmers to increase production and cut cost have often been 
frowned upon when first put into use. 



Tobacco growers have kept out of trouble only when they have 
produced a quality product in a quantity that was in line with do- 
mestic usings and the amount exported in a given year. Some- 
thing went wrong during the 1962 season. Early in the year the 
Secretary of Agriculture announced an increase in acreage oi 
4.3 per cent, which growers did not request. The increase in 
acreage seemed justified at the time due to healthy economic 
conditions throughout the world. Domestic consumption of to- 
bacco products were on the increase. Stocks held by manufactur- 
ers and the Stabilization Corporation were at a 2.6 years level, 
almost normal for the industry. 

However, before the crop was transplanted from the seed beds, 
things began to happen. First, the Royal College of Physicians 
of England issued a report on "Smoking and Health". This re- 
port reduced the consumption of cigarettes in England 15 to 20 
per cent. The effect of this report was felt over most of Europe. 
Prospects for the normal export sale of U. S. tobacco from the 
1962 crop diminished. The uncertainty of the turn the Common 
Market would take cast a further cloud over the prospects of sale 
of the 1962 crop to European Countries. 

Even here in the United States, the appointment by the Presi- 
dent of a committee to study the health effects from smoking, 
raised some question in the minds of buying companies during 
the 1962 season. 

To these events were added the facts that tobacco growers pro- 
duced a bumper crop of 1,400 million pounds, while domestic and 
foreign buying companies bought less tobacco on the warehouse 
floors, only 1,163 million pounds against 1, 188 in 1961. As a re- 
sult the Stabilization Corporation received 237 million pounds. 
The final results of the 1962 marketing season brought into focus 
the fact that for the past few years domestic and foreign manu- 
facturers have stated there has been a decline in the quality of 
U. S. flue-cured leaf. 

The general complaint of buyers is that the decline in quality 
is due largely to, (1) planting high-yielding low quality varieties; 
(2) use of too much or the wrong kind of fertilizer; (3) spacing 
plants too closely together and topping too high ; (4) harvesting 
tobacco before it is ripe ; (5) excessive irrigation ; (6) and the use 
of sucker control material. 

On November 2, 1962, the Secretary of Agriculture appointed 
the National Tobacco Industry Advisory Committee to review the 
tobacco situation and recommend necessary changes or legisla- 
tion that will continue to assure adequate supplies and favorable 




Acceptable voriefies plus recommended cultural practices produce desirable (obacco. 



prices to farmers. 

The Committee is composed of 40 members representing all 
segments of the tobacco industry. They were asked to study (1) 
the effect of cultural, curing and marketing practices in relation 
to quality of tobacco; (2) standards for evaluating quality; (3) 
foreign trade policies, and (4) the developing and releasing of 
new varieties. 

The Committee met on November 19 and 20, 1962, and con- 
sidered problems facing the tobacco industry. The following 
recommendations were made: To put two varieties, Coker 316 
and Reams 64, on the discount list for 1963, at 50 per cent sup- 
port level. That tobacco treated with MH-30 be discounted to a 
50 per cent level for 1963. That a review of inspection procedures 
and grade standards be made so that they will reflect more ade- 
quately current standards by the trade. 

Following these recommendations the Secretary of Agriculture 
ordered Coker 316 and Reams 64 discounted. The Department ac- 
cepted the Committe's recommendations to review grade stand- 
ards and corresponding price support rates for flue-cured tobacco, 
(see page 12) The Committee's recommendation to discount to- 



bacco treated with MH-30 met opposition from the growers. Be- 
cause of grower concern over this issue, the Secretary ordered 
that public hearings on this matter be held in the flue-cured area. 
Hearings were held in four flue-cured states at which all quality 
problems were discussed. From the testimony presented at the 
hearings and from other sources within the industry, the follow- 
ing conclusions as to the outlook can be reached. 

The domestic market for flue-cured tobacco may continue to 
increase as population increases. However, as population in- 
creases there will be more resistance to cigarettes by the younger 
smokers due to health charges and economic factors, such as 
increased excise taxes by states and municipalities pushing the 
retail price of a package of cigarettes above the 25 cent level. 



Estimated average cigarette prices and consumption figures for the 

United States and other selected nations 

(Calendar year 1961) 



Nation 


Average prico 

per. pks. 

of 20 

U. S. cents 


Taxes per pkg. 
imposed by 
central gov- 

eminents 
U. S. cents 


Per capita 
consumption^ 

cigarettes 


United States 

Australia 


27.0 
38.0 
24.0 
20.0 


8.0 
2'1.5 
13.0 
13.2 


3,985= 
2,760 
1,880 


Belgium 


1.655 


Canada 

France* 

Italy* 


37.5 
30.5 
30.0 


22.0 
22.6 
24.0 


2,960 
1,350 
1,440 


Japan* 


13.4 8.8 


2.060 


Netherlands 


26.6 
52.8 
16.5 
54.7 


18.0 
44.0 
11.0 
43.2 


1.840 
1,2'60 


Thialand* 

United Kingdom 


610 
2,835 


West Germany 

Ireland 

Denmark 

Finland 


42.0 
47.0 
56.0 
30.0 


23.5 
34.0 
44.8 
19.5 


1,780 
2.600 
1,600 
2.070 


Norway 


50.0 


31.0 


550 



^Population 15 years of age and over. -Includes 
•These countries h.ive government monopolies for 

Exports of flue-cured tobacco will probably remain at about 
the present level, so long as the prices of U. S. flue-cured are above 
the prices of tobacco in countries competing for the free world 
tobacco trade. 

The export situation for flue-cured tobacco can be summed up 




From good seeds come the strong healthy plants with strong root system which ore 
needed to produce quality tobacco. 

by this quotation from a U. S. Department of Agriculture Foreign 
Agricultural report. "Our foreign consumers expect the United 
States to produce and export tobacco which is superior in flavor 
and aroma. Failure to produce and export such tobacco may mean 
the loss of these markets. Our markets abroad cannot be ex- 
panded unless our tobaccos are competitively priced. If we main- 
tain and expand our export market, it is essential that we adopt 
policies and programs which will assure competitive prices on the 
export market." 



1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


73.9 


75.0 


77.2 


79.4 


65.7 


65.2 


71.1 


72.9 


5S.8 


56.9 


57.1 


59.2 


31.5 


37.0 


36.6 


31.6 



Prices of Flue-Cured Exports From Major Countries 

U. S. Cents Tcr Pound 
1950-54 

United States 63.4 

Canada 55.6 

Rhodesia ^ 58.1 

India 39.1 

Present stocks of flue-cured tobacco under Government loan are 
at 487 million pounds as against 680 million in 1957. These 
stocks will probably be reduced very little in the near future be- 
cause of the sales of 82 million pounds of the 1955 and 1956 crops 
at reduced prices early this year. 

The slow rate of sales coupled with the addition to inventory 
of 237 million pounds from the 1962 crop has pushed the stocks 
held on January 1, 1963, to the fifth largest inventory ever held 
by stabilization. On November 30, the Secretary of Agriculture 
announced flue-cured tobacco acreage allotments for most farms 
in 1963 will be five per cent smaller than for 1962. The five per 
cent reduction makes 710,190 acres available for allotment in 
1963, compared with 747,262 for 1962. Many growers felt the 
reduction should have been larger because of the large stocks held 
by stabilization. 

The Secretary of Agriculture announced on March 15 there 
would be no discount or identifying marks put on tobacco treated 
with MH-30 during the 1963 selling season. 

Growers have planted a larger assortment of varieties this 
year than in many years past and there will be no one variety 
predominant. From evidence gathered at the quality hearings 
growers will follow cultural practices which will produce ripe, 
grainy, full bodied tobacco which our domestic and foreign buyers 
have indicated will be in demand during the coming season. 



Burley Outlook 

North Carolina burley growers, who last year received a six 
percent increase in acreage for the second year in succession, ex- 
perienced more than a $5 drop in market average during the 1962 
marketing season. The drop in price caused growers to end the 
1962 season with less money even though they sold more tobacco, 
and the burley pool received about nine percent of the sales under 

10 



government loan, compared with 1.8 percent the previous year. 

In summarizing the outlook for 1963, the over all hurley situa- 
tion shows that thel962-63 total supply of hurley is 1,779 million 
pounds. This is about 72 million more than the supply was a year 
earlier, and equals to slightly more than a three year supply based 
upon the current rate of disappearance. 

The domestic use of burley was up about three percent last 
year and prospects are good for 1963. Exports of burley were up 
about 4 million pounds and were the largest on record. 

The support price for the 1963 crop of burley will move up to 
58.3 cents per pound, which is an increase of one percent. Since 
1963 acreage allotments for burley were unchanged, the demand 
for burley should continue strong during the year ahead. 



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State Summary 1962-63 

The 1962-63 marketing season was one of the most unstable that growers 
have experienced in a number of years. There were two marketing holidays 
during the season. The first was for three days, September 17 through 19, 
and the second holiday covered the week of October 15 through the 19. The 
holidays were necessary because of congestion in many redrying and pro- 
cessing plants. 

The quality of the 1962 crop was not as good in some areas, especially in 
portions of the Eastern Belt where considerable damage was done by heavy 
rains. But in other areas the quality was much better than the credit given 
it by many of the critics. One of the biggest troubles with the 1962 crop was 
too niucli tobacco. 

Producer sales on the 44 flue cured markets in North Carolina amounted to 
881,367.562 pounds during the 1962 season. They received $530,713,387 for 
these offerings, giving them a season average of $60.53. Producer sales in 

1961 amounted to 817,386,008 pounds, returning growers $500,109,487, for a 
record average in 1961 of $65.16. This shows that there was a drop in the 

1962 average price of $4.63. but the volume was up 63,981,554 pounds, and 
dollar value was up $30,603,900. 

The average support price on the 1962 crop was up 1%, bringing it up 
from the frozen level of 55.5 cents to 56.1 cents. The grade support prices 
for the 1962 crop of tied tobacco averaged approximately 89% of parity. 

Tj-j,e 13 — The 1962 marketing season started in the Border Belt on 
August 2, one day earlier than the 1961 opening. The first five days was 
devoted to the sale of untied tobacco of the priming and lug non-descript 
grades, with no support for tied tobacco during this period. About 85% 
of the grade averages were from $1.00 to $7.00 per hundred lower than prices 
paid for the same grades during the 1961 season. However, several non- 
descript grades were higher, showing gains of $7.00 or better. 

Growers selling in this belt received $110,253,987 from the sale of 179.996,824 
pounds of tobacco, giving them a 1962 season average of $61.25 per hundred. 
In 1961 growers received $102,935,842 for the 156,475,562 pounds offered, 
which was a record high average of $65.78 per hundred. 

Sales ended in this belt on October 12, with sales covering a period of 48 
sale days, compared with 40 during the previous year. 

Type 12 Eastern Belt markets opened for the 196 2 season on August 

21, with only untied primings and lugs receiving a support price for the first 
five sale days. The general quality was considerably below that of the pre- 
vious year due mainly to heavy rains and flooded conditions during the 
latter part of June and early July. This caused much of the tobacco in this 
area to have a washed out appearance. About 90 percent of the grades 
showed losses ranging from $1.00 to $11.00 per hundred when compared with 
the 1961 grade averages. 

Farmers sold 400,129,062 pounds on the 17 Eastern markets tor an average 
price of $59.91 per hundred, with a total dollar return of $239,716,393. In 
1961 growers selling in this belt received $252,729,977 for 386,055,705 pounds 
of tobacco, setting a record average of $65.46 per hundred. 

Final sales of the Eastern Belt were held on November 9. The season 
covered a period of 50 sale days, as compared with 52 during the previous 
year. 
14 



Type IIB — The 10 Mid-die Belt markets opened ou August 30, 1962, 
which was just one day earlier than the 1961 opening. Only untied tobacco 
was supported on these markets during the first 5 days. Two market holi- 
days were observed during the season due to congestion in redrying and 
processing facilities. Around 90 percent of the grades averaged $1.00 to 
$6.00 lower than the same grades average during the 1961 season. The big- 
gest losses occurred In unripe grades. 

The average price paid producers in this belt dropped to $60.84, while the 
volume increased to 171,898,450 pounds, returning to growers $104,581,804. In 
1961 growers received a record average of $65.13 per hundred for 146,297,458 
pounds, which gave them a cash return of $95,283,770, or about $9.3 million 
less than was received in 1962. 

The Middle Belt season ended ou November 21 after two market holidays 
and 50 days of sales. The 1961 season covered 55 sale days. 

Type tlA — The Old Belt markets first opened for the 1962 season on 
September 10, however, because of the lack of buying representation, sales 
were suspended after sales on this date until September 17. Because of the 
postponement of the Old Belt opening, the U. S. Department of Agriculture 
decided to give support to both tied and untied tobacco during the first five 
days of sales in this belt. The general quality of offering in the Old Belt 
showed only minor changes from the previous year. There was a slight 
decrease in the percentage of poor quality leaf and a corresponding increase 
in fair quality leaf, with a slight drop in percentage of smoking leaf. About 
88 percent of the grades showed a decline in average prices ranging from 
$1.00 to $9.00 per hundred as compased with the prveious year. 

Producer sales on N. C. Old Belt markets during the 1962 season moved 
up to 129,343,226 pounds, averaging $58.83 per hundred, returning to growers 
$76,161,203. Compared with the previous year it shows growers received 
$70,355,857 for 111,212,540 pounds of tobacco, which averaged $63.26, for the 
1961 season. 

Old Belt markets held final sales for the 1962 season on December 12. 
They were closed during the week of October 15-17 market holiday, which 
gave them a season of 56 sale days. In 1961 the season covered 62 sale days. 

Type 31 — The three hurley markets in North Carolina at Asheville, 
Boone and West Jefferson opened for the 1962-63 selling season on November 
27, which is the same date they opened the previous year. The quality of 
offerings were noticeably lower, and about 80 percent of the grades showed 
losses ranging from $4.00 to $24.00 per hundred, when compared with the 
year before. Approximately 95 percent of the North Carolina crop was sold 
during the first four weeks before Christmas. 

The volume of producer sales in North Carolina rose to 20,891,171 pounds, 
returning to growers $12,400,863. The average price dropped to $59.36. 
During the 1961-62 season, growers made a record average of $65.98, and 
received $12,904,498 for 19,558,348 pounds sold. Approximately nine percent 
of the 1962 burley crop went under government loan, compared to about one 
percent in 1961. 

The last N. C. burley markets closed for the season on January 11. 1963, 
covering a period of 24 sale days, compared with 23 sale days during the 
previous year. 



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Summary of N. C. Dealer and Warehouse 
Resales -1962-63 



Belt 



Pounds 



^"teaVll 4.125,964 

Warehouse 10,801,4o5 

^"'*"" if;" 7,786,334 

Warehouse s,M-,ii^ 

Middle Belt 4,203,024 

^^ouse'- ::::;::::;;;:::;:::;::::::::::::::""::""■■-■•■■■ ^,793,354 

"'•' ,^„'" , 2,861,446 

^^rSouse ■■;;;;;::::::;::;::;;;;;;;;:;::;:;::::::;;;:::;: 8.255,936 

Bu'-l'y B^" 1,183,814 

^^ouse-::::::;:::::::::;;:;::::;;::::::::::::::::::::;: 2.580.798 



Producer and Gross Sales of Flue Cured 
Tobacco by States— 1962 



state 




Produ 
1962 (Poun 


cer 

Js) 


Sales 
1961 


Gross Salos 
1982 (Pounds) 


1961 


N C 
\a 
S C 
Ga 
Fla 


Total 


881,367,562 
161,875,533 
166,753.895 
164,596,618 
25,211,438 

1,S99 SO.';, 046 




60.53 
61.92 
61.38 
56.91 
56.20 

60.0.S 


946,477,307 
170,508,267 
185,641,299 
176,157,944 
27,909,904 

1,506,6(11.721 


59.87 
61.67 
61.06 
56.64 
56 18 

59.75 



Stabilization Receipts by Belts -1952 

Producers S'abilization Percenago 

B,„ Type S ales (lbs.) Receipts (lbs.) Stab. Received 

rrr -..mi is ,'.9 93,416,-84 3::. 07 

Old Belt 1 A ni 898450 34 923,466 2U.31 

Middle Belt .IIB Inn 1^9062 66 683 598 16.66 

Eastern B.lt 12 Me'JSonO 37,238 324 10.73 

Border Bdt 13 isqsos'ose 4,769.048 2.51 

Ga.-Fla. Belt 14 189,so»,uo'> ' 

Total ITTlT 1,399,805,046 237,032,720 W-SS 



18 



^^l£t^^ (L^^-r.^:^ 



DuiluyvTobacco^Movement In and Out of 
North Carolina 



state 




N. C. Tobacco 
1962 (Pou 


Sold Out of State 
nds) 1961 


Out of State Tobacco Sold in N. C. 
1962 (Pounds) 1961 


Va 




45,306,472 




34.801,.54SI 

12,074,637 

5,861,080 

120,893 


11,612,041 

20,251,774 

1,256 






S. C. .. 
Ga 




12,046.796 

4,625,589 


13,759,025 


Fla 




52,185 




Ala. ... 












Total 




52,858,159 








62,031,042 


31,865,071 


23,010,845 



^=fc^^^F«^Movement In and Out of 
North Carolina 



Tenu - 5,501,161 5,142,266 1,175,520 1,566,124 

Va 2,486 2,285,169 1,957,257 

W. Va 32,698 28,612 

Ky 



Total 5,503,647 



North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 
1919-1962* 

Yield Per 
Year No. Acres Acre Production Value Average 

(Pounds) (1,000 lbs.) (1.000 Dollars) Piice 



1919 


521,000 


612 


319,276 


$157,340 


$49.30 


1920 


621,900 


681 


423,703 


88,271 


20.80 


1921 


414,900 


594 


246,540 


60,402 


24.50 


1922 


444,000 


611 


271,170 


74.572 


27.50 


1923 


544,300 


728 


396,354 


81,998 


20.70 


1924 


473,500 


585 


276.819 


62,597 


22.60 


1925 


536,200 


696 


373,352 


83,756 


22.40 


1926 


546,700 


692 


378,274 


96,762 


25.60 


1927 


639,600 


755 


482.982 


100.414 


20.80 


1928 


712,400 


692 


493.132 


93.450 


19.00 


1929 


729,300 


665 


484.630 


89,470 


18.50 


1930 


768,000 


757 


581,200 


74,733 


12.90 


1931 


688,500 


692 


476,382 


42,024 


8.80 


1932 


462,500 


624 


288.750 


34,949 


12.10 


1933 


667,800 


794 


520,133 


85,530 


16.10 


1934 


486,500 


847 


412,055 


117,999 


28.60 


1935 


612,500 


635 


572,625 


116,418 


20.30 


1936 


591,000 


765 


451.975 


101,856 


22.50 


1937 


675,000 


883 


595.815 


143,058 


24.00 


1938 


603,500 


844 


509,470 


115,428 


22.70 


1939 


843,000 


964 


812,540 


123,893 


15.20 


1940 


498,000 


1,038 


516,835 


85,792 


16.60 


1941 


488,000 


928 


452,825 


132,291 


29.20 


1942 


539,000 


1,052 


566,810 


221,538 


39.10 


1943 


580,000 


935 


542,200 


219,074 


40.40 


1944 


684,000 


1,077 


736.990 


317,628 


43.10 


1945 


722,000 


1,100 


794,310 


349,148 


44.00 


1946 


802,000 


1,138 


912,970 


451,639 


49.50 


1947 


783,000 


1,139 


892,205 


374,513 


42.00 


1948 


594.000 


1,239 


739,380 


368,040 


49.80 


1949 


621,000 


1,178 


731,530 


352,508 


48.20 


1950 


640,000 


1,441 


858,140 


477,508 


55.60 


1951 


735,000 


1,331 


978.375 


523,358 


53.50 


1952 


735,000 


1,222 


898,090 


448,582 


49.90 


1953 


674,000 


1,235 


832,305 


447,076 


53.70 


1954 


686,000 


1,204 


889,490 


483,003 


54.30 


1955 


653,000 


1,499 


978,775 


520,845 


53.20 


1956 


579,000 


1,661 


961,495 


496,324 


51.60 


1957 


443,000 


1,469 


650,780 


358,442 


55.10 


1958 


429,000 


1,718 


736,855 


427,307 


58.00 


1959 


458,500 


1,533 


702.942 


407,055 


57.90 


1960 


457,500 


1,836 


839,870 


512,731 


61.10 


1961 


463,000 


1,797 


832,215 


541,468 


65.10 


1962** 


484,000 


1,871 


905,460 


547,516 


60.50 



and USD A Crop Reporting Scrvlc 
iilnary for li)(;2. 



20 



North Carolina Burley Crops 
1928-1962* 







Yield Per 








Year 


No. Acres 


Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 






(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


192S 


3,600 


650 


2,340 


$ 690 


$29.50 


1929 


5,500 


730 


4,015 


863 


21.50 


1930 


7,200 


750 


5,400 


853 


15.80 


1931 


7,100 


710 


5,041 


464 


9.20 


1932 


6,500 


735 


4,778 


726 


15.20 


1933 


9,200 


785 


7,222 


715 


9.90 


1934 


5,500 


870 


4,785 


809 


17.50 


1935 


5,200 


925 


4,810 


1,025 


21.30 


1936 


6,000 


900 


5,400 


2,095 


38.80 


1937 


9,000 


975 


8,775 


1,787 


21.40 


193S 


8,600 


900 


7,740 


1,308 


16.90 


1939 


8,100 


1,070 


8,667 


1,447" 


16.70 


1940 


6,500 


1,050 


6,825 


1,242 


18.20 


1941 


6,200 


1,075 


6,665 


2,093 


31.40 


1942 


6,600 


1,150 


7,590 


3,211 


42.30 


1943 


8,500 


1,225 


10,412 


5,102 


49.00 


1944 


12,000 


1,390 


16,680 


8,157 


48.90 


1945 


13.000 


1,500 


19,500 


7,568 


38.30 


1946 


9,800 


1,475 


14,455 


5,999 


41.50 


1947 


9,600 


1,560 


14,976 


6,335 


42.30 


1948 


10,300 


1,680 


17,304 


8,012 


46.30 


1949 


10,800 


1,440 


15,552 


6,750 


43.40 


1950 


10,500 


1,700 


17,850 


9,175 


51.40 


1951 


12,200 


1,750 


21,350 


11,572 


54.20 


1952 


12,000 


1,680 


20,160 


9,818 


48.70 


1953 


11,400 


1,800 


20,520 


11,019 


53.70 


1954 


12,700 


1,920 


24,384 


12,680 


52.00 


1955 


9,800 


1,900 


18,620 


10,651 


57.20 


1956 


9,400 


1,850 


17,390 


10,747 


61.80 


1957 


9,600 


1,975 


18,960 


11,073 


58.40 


1958 


9,300 


2,000 


18,600 


11,978 


64.40 


1959 


9,800 


2,060 


20,188 


11,426 


56.60 


1960 


9,500 


1,940 


18,430 


12,016 


65.20 


1961 


10,400 


2,090 


21,736 


14,346 


66.00 


1962** 


11,200 


2,075 


23,240 


13,944 


60.00 



•Snuri-e : N. r and USDA Crop Reporting Service. 
•♦Preliminary for 1962 with value based on market average. 



21 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments 
1963 



Acreage 
County ^o. Farms Allotment 

Alamance 1,453 

Alexander 991 

Anson -"'^' 

Beaufort - _ :-- 2,412 

Bertie _ — - 1.758 

Bladen - 3,291 

Brunswick 1,753 

Burke - 1 

Cabarrus ..., - - 1 

Caldwell - - - 261 

Camden - - - 2 

Carteret ..-- - - - ^16 

Caswell - ■ 1'954 

Catawba - - ^ 

Chatham 1'102 

Chowan - - - - 195 

Cleveland - - 1 

Columbus - - - - ^'972 

Craven - - IS'i-S 

Cumberland - 2,433 

Dare - - 1 

Davidson - 1,911 

Davie - - S43 

Duplin - - ^'385 

Durham - - I'^'SS 

Edgecombe - - - 1,605 

Forsyth - 2,332 

Franklin .-. 2.700 



Gaston 



1 



Gates - 125 

Granville 2,160 



Greene 



1,265 



Guilford '•203 

Halifax - 2,197 

Harnett ^••'^O 



Hertford 
Hoke 



Iredell 



966 
840 
838 



Johnston 5'''29 

Jones ^^^ 



Lee 



1,323 



Lenoir 1 ^M 



4,661.25 


37 


1,350.34 


50 


390.64 


61 


9,436.74 


21 


5,611.60 


31 


7,343.83 


28 


3,264.93 


41 


.57 


69 


.03 


73 


473.44 


59 


4.63 


66 


1,331.47 


51 


9,080.12 


23 


4.68 


65 


2,893.06 


46 


541.06 


58 


.34 


70 


16,305.45 


7 


8,436.78 


24 


5,238.44 


34 


.07 


72 


3,218.92 


44 


1,156.37 


53 


15,291.32 


8 


3,731.54 


39 


11,387.35 


16 


4,822.49 


35 


11,279.77 


IS 


4.55 


67 


267.86 


62 


13,171.21 


13 


11,854.02 


15 


8,976.11 


22 


5,828.87 


31 


14,309.31 


11 


3,232.16 


45 


2.530.38 


47 


1,213.14 


52 


22,513.00 


2 


5,367.87 


33 


4,053.29 


38 


13,807.58 


12 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments 
1963 (Continued) 

Acreage 
County No. Farms Allotment Ro 

Martin _ 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery ^ 

Moore _ 

Nash 

New Hanover — 

Northampton _. 

Onslow _-. 

Orange . 

Pamlico _ _ 

Pender 

Person 

Pitt _ 1:^. 

Randolph 

Richmond — 

Robeson _. 

Rockingham 

Rowan ._ 

Sampson _ 

Scotland 

Stokes 

Surry 

Tyrell 

Vance _. 

Wake _ 

Warren 

Washington 

Wayne 

Wilkes .._ 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

State Total 



1,546 


8,414.76 


25 


1 


.28 


71 


433 


956.62 


56 


1,608 


4,839.29 


36 


2,996 


17,924.28 


5 


89 


211.00 


63 


221 


465.48 


60 


1,867 


6,172.58 


29 


965 


3,258.52 


40 


407 


1,085.74 


55 


1,688 


3,243.72 


43 


1,742 


9,543.54 


20 


- '2,686 


24,998.13 


1 


1,644 


3,237.57 


42 


990 


2,060.32 


48 


4,739 


20,464.61 


3 


3,025 


12,906.87 


14 


39 


34.55 


64 


5,332 


15,108.41 


9 


561 


1,140.81 


54 


2,754 


11,331.37 


17 


3,122 


10,816.96 


19 


2 


.91 


68 


1,472 


8,102.38 


26 


3,799 


19,179.01 


4 


1,946 


6,034.09 


30 


297 


948.60 


57 


3,089 


14,391.47 


10 


954 


1,528.80 


49 


2,135 


16,648.09 


6 


2,688 


7,959.94 


27 


119,632 


467,395.28 


1-73 



23 



N. C. Burley Allotments 
1963 



County ^o- ^'""'»*' 

Alleghany 520 

Ashe 2,489 

Avery - - 245 

Brunswick - 

Buncombe - S,06?i 

Burke - - ^^ 

Caldwell - - - 24 

Catawba - - * 

Cherokee - - - ^^^ 

Clay - 205 

Cleveland -- ^ 

Davidson - ^ 

Gaston - ■'■ 

Graham _ - - ''20 

Granville — — - - — --■ -'- 

Haywood - - - 2,052 

Henderson - - ^20 

Iredell . - --- - ^ 

Jackson — - - - 320 

Lincoln 2 

McDowell - 8^ 

Macon - - 244 

Madison .... - - - 2,969 

Mitchell - ^^^ 

Polk - - - '^ 

Randolph - - •'■ 

Rutherford ^^ 

Stokes - - - 2 

Surry ^ 

Swain _ 229 

Transylvania '^^ 

Watauga - l-^*^ 

Wilkes 24 

Yadkin - 1 

Yancey ^•^'^'^ 

State Total . 18,205 

•Source: rSI).\ .\Kn<uUuri- Stitblllzatlni, u.ul rnn.seivntlnn. 
••ArrciiRc iillnlmcnls In ruiiml niimhiTs ot wlinli- iUTi'S, 



Acreage 
Allotment Rank 



253 


9 


1,273 


5 


130 


11 


1 


35 


1,862 


2 


5 


21 


11 


20 


1 


26 


76 


15 


95 


12 


3 


23 


2 


27 


1 


29 


391 


8 


1 


34 


1,287 


3 


53 


16 


2 


24 


139 


10 


1 


32 


32 


19 


82 


14 


2,89S 


1 


589 


7 


2 


25 


1 


30 


34 


IS 


1 


32 


1 


28 


S2 


13 


37 


17 


909 


6 


4 


22 


1 


33 


1,293 


4 


11,553 


1-35 



24 



North Carolina Todacco Warehouses 
and Operators By Belks and Markets 

BORDER BELT 

Chadbourii (one set buyers) 

Producers — Jack W. Garrett, J. Franklin Bullard 
Green-Teachey — J. C. Green 

Clarkton (one set buyers) 

Bright Leaf— J. M. Bryant, B. P. Rivenbark, H. G. Perry 
New Chicken Whse. — Talley Bros. & Sons 

Pair Bluff (one set buyers) 

Powell — A. H. Powell & Sons 
Littleton's — Sidney Wise, J. C. McNeil 
Planters — George R. Carter 

Fairmont (4 sets buyers) 

People's Big 5 — E. J. Chambers, Yarboro & Garrett Co. 

Davis & Mitchell Davis — F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell 

Holliday-Frye— E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. Holiday 

Planters No. 1 & 2 — G. R. Royster, Daniel 

Square Deal 1-2-3 — W. C. Bassett 

Star Carolina 1-2-3— W. M. Puckett 

Liberty-Twin State — P. R. Floyd, Jr., Paul Wilson, P. P. Joyce, Joe Pell 

Big Brick— V. J. Griffin, A. D. Lewis, Jr. 

Fayetteville (one set buyers) 

Big Farmers 1 & 2— P. L. Campbell, Sherrill Aiken 
Planters — J. W. Stephenson, J. C. Adams 

Luinberton (three sets buyers) 

Carolina — M. A. Roycroft, J. L. Townsend 
Smith-Dixie — Purman Biggs, Sr. & Jr. 
Hedgepeth — R. A. Hedgepeth, R. L. Rollins 
Liberty — R. H. Livermore 
Star, Inc. — Hogan Teater, D. T. Stephenson 
Lumberton Cooperative — C. E. McLaurin, Mgr. 

Tabor City (one set buyers) 

By Pass-Carolina & New Farmers — R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
Planters — Don Watson, Mgr. 

AVhiteville (three sets buyers) 

Crutchfield— G. E. & R. W. Crutchfield 

Lea's Big Dixie — William Townes Lea, Louie Love 

Moore's — A. H. Moore, C. C. Mason, C. F. Jeffcoat 

Nelson's No. 1 & 2 — John H. Nelson 

Planters No. 1 & 2— A. O. King, Jr., J. W. Peay 

Gray-Neal Farmers-Columbus County — A. Dial Gray. J. L. Neal 

Liberty — J. W. Hooks, I. A. Barefoot & Sons 

Smith — Ernest Smith, Paul Jeffreys 

25 



EASTERN BEIiT 

Ahoskie (one set buyers) 

Basnlght No. 1-2-3— L. L. Wilkens, H. G. Veazey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2— W. M. Odom, Pierce & Winborne 

Clinton (one set buyers) 

Carolina— L. D. Herring, C. J. Strickland 

Ross No. 2 — Guy R. Ross 

Farmers— H. A. Carr, J. A. Chestnutt, J. J. Hill 

Dunn (one set buyers) 

Big 4 Warehouse— Tom Smothers, Jack Calhoun. Norman Hardes 
Planters — Leland Lee, J. M. Smothers 

Fai-mville (two sets buyers) 
Bell's — Bell Brothers 
Farmers — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 
Monks — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 
Planters & Prewits — Chester Worthington. W. A. Newell, B. S. C 

& C. Prewit 
Lee's & Johnson's— Gordon Lee, L. B. Johnson 

Goldsboro (one set buyers) 

Carolina— S. G. Best, D. V. Smith, D. Price / 

Farmers No. 1— S. B. Hill, Carl Holloman, J. F. Hill 

Big Brick— J. R. Musgrave 

Victory — Richard Gray, Clarence Whitley 

New Planters— J. I. Musgrave, W. W. Barnes, King Roberts 

Greenville (five sets buyers) 

Cannon's— W. T. Cannon, Carlton Dail 

Farmers — J. A. Tripp 

Star-Planters— Harding Suggs, B. B. Suggs, L. T. Hill 

McGowan's— J. A. Worthington, Jack Moye 

New Carolina No. 1 & 2— Lee Paramore, Laddie Avery 

New Independent— Bob CuUipher, F. L. Blount 

Victory — Harold Forbes, Fenner Allen, Wayland Hunsucker 

Raynor-Forbes— Noah Raynor, A. H. Forbes 

Keel's— Ashley Wynne, Floyd McGowan 

Harris & Rogers— R. E. Rogers 

Kinston (four sets buyers) 

Central — W. L Herring, Bill King 

Farmers— J. T. Jenkins 

Kinston Cooperative — S. W. Smith 

New Dixie — John Jenkins, Mgr. 

Sheppard No. 1— J. T. Sheppard 

Sheppard No. 2— J. T. Sheppard 

New Central— W. I. Herring, Bill King 

The Star Warehouse No. 1— C. J. Herring 

The Star Warehouse No. 2 — C. J. Herring 

Banner— K. W. Loftin, John Heath 

Brooks Whse.— Roger Brooks, Jr.. Frederick Brooks 

26 



Robeisonville (one set buyers) 

Adkins & Bailey — R. K. Adkins 

Gray & Gray- (Red Front) — J. H. Gray, Jack Sharpe 

Planters No. 1 & 2— H. T. Hlghsmitli, E. G. Anderson 

Rocky Mount (four sets buyers) 

Cobb & Carlton No. 1 & 2— W. E. Cobb, J. C. Carlton 

Mangum — Roy M. Phipps 

Planters No. 1-2-3 — W. H. Faulkner, Mgr. 

Smith No. 1 & 2 — James D. Smith 

Works Warehouse — R. J. Works & Son 

Easley Warehouse Co., Inc. — H. A. Easley, Mgr. 

Farmers Warehouse, Inc. — J. C. Holt Evans, Mgr. 

Fenners — J. B. Fenner 

Sinithfleld (two sets buyers) 

Big Planters — J. B. Wooteu, Mrs. W. A. Carter 

Farmers No. 1 & 2 — Joe & C. E. Stephenson 

Gold Leaf No. 1 & 2— R. A. Pearce 

Perkins Riverside — N. L. Perkins 

Wallace No. 1 & 2 — Lawrence and Dixon Wallace 

Skinner's — Frank Skinner 



Tarboro (one set buyers) 

Clark's No. 1 & 2— H. I. Johnson, S. A. McConkey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2— W. L. House, J. P. Bunn 
Victory No. 1 & 2— Cliff Weeks, W. L. Leggett 

Wallace (one set buyers) 

Blanchard & Farrior — O. C. Blanchard, W. H. Farrior 
Hussey No. 1 & 3 — Joe Bryant, Bill Hussey 
Sheffield's— John Sheffield 
Farmers — H. G. Perry, Bill Hussey, Jr. 

Wasliington (one set buyers) 

Sermons No. 1 & 2 — W. J. Sermons, J. E. Roberson 
Talley-Hassell 1 & 2— M. M. Hassell, W. G. Talley 

Wendell (one set buyers) 

Farmers — J. W. Stephenson & Sons 
Liberty 1 & 2— H. F. Harris 
Northside — G. Dean 

Wilson (five sets buyers) 

Big Dixie — E. B. Hicks, W. C. Thompson 

Wainwright — G. L. Wainwright 

Center Brick No. 1-2-3 — Cozart & Eagles Co. 

Farmers — J. J. Gibbons, S. G. Deans 

Growers Cooperative — S. E. Griffin, Mgr. 

New Planters No. 1 & 2— R. T. & W. C. Smith, B. W. Carr 

Smith Warehouse, Inc. — H. H. Harris, Jr., Mgr. 

Watson — U. H. Cozart, Jr., Pres. 

Clark's— C. R. & Boyd Clark 

New Liberty — Carl B. Renfro 



27 



Williainston (one set buyers) 

Farmers— John A. Griffin, Leman Barnhill 
Rodgers Whse. — Urbin Rogers, Russell Rogers 
New Dixie — Jim Pierce, Fisher Harris 

Windsor (one set buyers) 

Planters 1 & 2— C. B. & B. U. Griffin 
Heckstall — Max Hux, Julian Heckstall 
Spruills— H. B. Spruill 

MIDDLE BEIvT 

Aberdeen (one set buyers) 

New Aberdeen — Tom Faulkner 
Planters — W. Fentriss Phillips 
Hardee's — Hugh T. Hardee 

Carthage (one set buyers) 

McConnells — G. Hoover Carter 
Victory — Earl Ennis & Buck Layton 

Durham (three sets buyers) 
Liberty — Walker Stone 
Roycroft— H. T., M. A. & J. C. Currin 
Star-Brick — A. L. Carver, Cozart, Currin 
Farmers-Planters— J. M. Talley, Howard Talley, Bob Dale, Sam Mangum 

EUerbe (one set buyers) 

Farmers — R. P. Brim, Jr. 

Richmond County— Bud Rummage, Bill Mariner 

Fuquay-Varina (two sets buyers) 

Big Top— Bill Talley & E. E. Clayton 
New Deal— W. M., A. R., A. L. Talley 
Goldleaf— Sherrill Akins & J. W. Dail 
Carolina — P. L. Campbell 

Henderson (two sets buyers) 
Banner— E. C. Huff 
Carolina— M. L. High, J. S. Royster 
Moore's Big Henderson — A. H. Moore 
Farmers — W. J. Alston, Jr. 
High Price— C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner 
Liberty — George T. Robertson 
Ellington— F. H. Ellington & Sons 

1/oiiisburg (one set buyers) 

Big Franklin— A. N. Wilson, S. T. & H. H. Cottrell 

Southside A & B — Charlie Ford 

Friendly Four — L. L. Sturdivant, James Speed 

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Oxford (two sets buyers) 

Banner — W. L. Mitchell, Jr., David Mitchell 
Mangum-Farmers — T. B. Williams, Julian Adcock, S. B. Knott 
Fleming No. 1 & 2— G. B. Watkins, D. T. Currin 
Planters & Johnson — C. R. "Watkins, C. R. Watkins, Jr. 
Owens No. 1 & 2 — J. S. Watkins, L. Gregory 
Granville— L. S. Bryan, Jr., W. W. Yeargin 

Sanford (one set buyers) 

Twin City 1 & 2— W. M. Carter, T. V. Mansfield 
King Roberts 1-2-3 — King Roberts 
Castleberrys — C. N. Castleberrys, Bill Wood 

Warrenton (one set buyers) 
Boyd's — W. P. Burwell 

Centre No. 1 & 2— M. P. Carroll, E. W. Radford 
Farmers — B. G. Tarwater 
Thompson — C. E. Thompson 
Currin's No. 1 — C. W. Currin 
Currin's No. 2 — C. W. Currin 



OLD BELT 

Burlliigtou (one set buyers) 

Carolina — Harold Perkins, Burch Keck 
Coble — N. C. Newman, Curry King 
Farmers — Bill & Jack McCauley 

Greensboro (one set buyers) 

Greensboro Tobacco Warehouse Co. — R. C. Coleman, Mgr. 

Guilford County Tobacco Warehouse Co. — H. P. Smothers, W. R. Hull 

Madison (one set buyers) 

New Brick— R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster 
Carolina— R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webstter 
Sharpe & Smith— W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 
Farmers — W. S. Smith, H, A. Fagg 

Mebane (one set buyers) 

Farmers 1 & 2 — Joe Dillard, Jule Allen 

New Piedmont — A. O. King, Jr., Billy Hopkins, Hugh Strayhorn 

Mt. Aii-j' (one set buyers) 

New Farmers — Tom Jones, Buck White, 0. L. Badgett, F. V. Dearmin 
Hunters — J. W., J. L. Hunter 

Reidsville (one set buyers) 

Farmers— C. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, D. Huffines 
Leader-Watts — A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pennix 
Smothers— T. B. & J. M. Smothers 
Browns— C. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael 



29 



Roxboro (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Lindsay Wagstaff, R. L. Hester 

Hyco — W. R. Jones, F. J. Hester, George Walker 

Foarce — H. W. Winstead, Jr., Pres. 

Planters No. 2— T. O. Bass 

Winstead— T. T. & Elmo Mitchell 

Pioneer — T. T. & Elmo Mitchell 

StonevlUe (one set buyers) 

Joyce's No. 1 & 2—0. P. Joyce, Willis Wake 
Farmers — F. A. Brown. P. M. Moorefleld 
Piedmont— J. J. Webster 

Winston-Saleni (four sets buyers) 

Brown— R. W. Newsome, W. B. Simpson 
Carolina-Star— G. H. Robertson, H. M. Bouldin 
Growers— Floyd Joyce, W. G. Sheets, J. R. Poll, M. M. Joyner 
Pepper No. 1 & 2— Fred Owens, F. L. Kellam 
Taylor— Paul Taylor 
Big Winston— R. T. & J. F. Carter 

Cooks No. 1 & 2— B. E. Cook, C. B. Strickland, William Fowler, H. A. 
Thomas 

N. C. BURLEY BELT 

Asheville (two sets buyers — second set incomplete) 
Burley-Dixie No. 1 & 2— L. J. Hill 
Planters No. 1 & 2— J. W. Stewart 
Bernard-Walker Warehouse— James E. Walker, Mgr. 
Day's— Charlie Day 

Boone (one set buyers) 

Mountain Burley No. 1 & 2— Joe E. Coleman 

Farmers Burley — Joe E. Coleman 

Big Burley— King Roberts, R. E. Bullock 

West Jefferson (one set buyers) 

Tri-State Burley— C. C. Taylor, Rex Taylor 
Farmers Burley— Tom Faulkner, Hoover Carter 



30 



CIGARETTE TAXES: HERE'S WHAT YOU PAY 

(Combined State and Federal Excise Taxes Per Carton) 



Ta^' Per 
State Carton 

Washington -,.$1.50 

Montana 1.60 

North Dakota - - 1.40 

Oregon 80 

Idaho - 1.40 

Wyoming 1.20 

California 1.10 

Nevada 1.50 

Utah 1.20 

Colorado .80 

Arizona 1.00 

New Mexico 1.60 

Alaska - 1.60 

Hawaii „ 1.20 

South Dakota .-.. 1.30 

Nebraska 1.20 

Kansas _ „ 1.20 

Oklahoma 1.50 

Texas 1.60 

Minnesota 1.50 

Iowa - 1.20 

Missouri 1.20 

Arkansas 1.40 

Louisiana 1.60 

Mississippi 1.60 

Alabama 1.40 



Tax Per 
State Carton 

Florida 1.30 

Georgia 1.30 

South Carolina - 1.30 

North Carolina ._ 80 

Tennessee -- 1.30 

Kentucky 1.05 

Wisconsin 1.40 

Illinois 1.20 

Indiana 1.10 

Michigan 1.50 

Ohio 1.30 

West Virginia 1.40 

Virginia -- 1.10 

Pennsylvania 1.40 

District of Columbia..... 1.00 

Maryland 1.40 

Delaware 1.30 

New Jersey 1.50 

New York 1.30 

Connecticut 1.30 

Rhode Island 1.40 

Vermont . 1.50 

Massachusetts 1.40 

New Hampshire 1.15 

Maine 140 



Source: Tobacco Tax Council 



31 



DOMESTIC CIGARETTE CONSUMPTION 
BY KINDS 1962 




Total Domestic Consumption 
498 Billion Cigarettes